Category: How to Grow

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Jan 21

Small Space Gardening

Gardening Jones is growing her own sweet potato slips.

As I mentioned in my last post, we are downsizing the gardens this year. Dramatically down. From about 800 sq. ft. plus containers, we’re going down to less than 200 plus containers. In the pic above the colored areas were all planted last year. What it doesn’t show is on the left, the yellow box …

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Jan 16

We’re Downsizing the Gardens. There, I Said it.

Gardening Jones is paring down her seed stash and giving them away.

A co-worker in her late 70’s told me the day she felt old was when she had to sit down to get her underwear on. I remember my Dad, a Navy man and lifelong swimmer said the day he felt old was when he went to dive into the swimming pool, and opted to use …

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Feb 02

Garden Planning – 18 Tomatoes Making the Cut

Gardening Jones shares which tomato varieties made the cut for 2017.

Seeds from tomatoes can remain viable for 10 years or more, so it’s easy enough to develop a collection of varieties. Especially if you also save your own. When I tell you, and this isn’t bragging, that I have 43 packets of seeds that were given to me, saved, or purchased… well if you know …

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Jan 23

12 Random Things to Know About Saving Seeds

 Let cucumbers get over ripe, even turn yellow, before saving the seeds. Know that veggies can only cross with their same species. So a zucchini might cross with a pumpkin, both are C. pepo, but not with a hubbard squash, C. moschata. More on that here. Tomatoes can cross pollinate, but it is much less …

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Jan 13

13 Varieties of Sweet Peppers

Gardening Jones shares some varieties of sweet peppers you may want to check out.

  We haven’t tried all these sweet peppers yet, but thought we would share what got our attention. Note that we are not affiliated with the companies we have linked. We just added those in case you wanted to get a look at the fruit. Note the DTM or Days to Maturity are for transplants. …

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Oct 30

Chef’s Choice Green Tomato

Gardening Jones shares her experience with the AAS winner Chef's Choice Tomato.

  Chef’s Choice Green is another in the line of wonderful AAS winning hybrid tomatoes. We tried Orange also, read about that here.   We really liked the taste, very homegrown tomato much like any good red variety. But the color lends itself to more interesting dishes than the typical tomato recipes. Please note that …

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Sep 04

Chef’s Choice Orange Tomato

Gardening Jones shares her thoughts on the AAS Winner Chef's Choice Orange Tomato.

Artisan style pizza with orange marinara? Multi-color Tomato Salad? Yep, You Can Grow That! This is the first time we have ever grown an orange tomato, hard to believe I know. So we cannot compare it to another orange type, but just share our thoughts. We love this 2014 All America Selection for a number of reasons: …

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Aug 19

The Watermelon Radish

Gardening Jones shares her take on this pretty radish variety.

It is always fun to try new veggie varieties. We enjoy seeing how they actually look compared to stock photos, if there is a difference in taste, learning about where they came from, and sharing all of that with you. Also known as Chinese Red Meat radish, this is a variety of Daikon radish from …

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Jul 24

Katarina Cabbage 2016 AAS Winner

Gardening Jones shares her experience goring the All-America Selections winner Katrina.

This delightful little All-America Selections winning cabbage is perfect for containers or anywhere space might be an issue. We also like them because 1 head is perfect for just the 2 of us. You can harvest the whole plant, or just cut the head and leave the rest of the plant in the ground. Katarina …

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Jun 12

When to Start Fall Crops

Gardening Jones shares how she decides when to plant seeds for a fall harvest.

I know, it’s only the middle of June and already we’re talking about the fall plants. But the time to get started is now. There are a few crops that actually like the cold, and even taste sweeter if allowed to get some frosts. Recently we learned that Brussel Sprouts in particular can be harvested …

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