Jan 03

Links of Interest

Spring just may be here sooner than you think.

Spring just may be here sooner than you think.

Each Sunday we will provide links to some of the more interesting things we have come across.

We hope these will entertain and inform you, perhaps save you some time and money as well.

A year of gardening Gonnas from Helen Yoest.

This will warm your heart.

Some interesting places to go in winter.

DIY Seed Bombs

3 Avocado Life Hacks

33 Ways to Go Green This Year

Giving Robots the Power to Say “No

Video: Mason Bees Emerges From Cocoon

Apr 21

Murphy’s Garden

murphy's law of gardening

Call it Mother Nature, or call it Murphy’s Law, but the gardener is only a player on the growing stage.

One thing we have learned is that no matter how long you wait for a seedling to sprout, as soon as you replant, the first one will come up.
Followed very quickly by the more recently planted.

The second planting of seeds were marked in this picture above. A week later the first seed sprouted. One more week and here you have it.

free plants

Apparently this also holds true when you reuse seed starting mix.

We finally gave up on a few seeds that never sprouted, and dumped the mix in with our potting soil.
This little patio tomato, center above, was potted up about 2 weeks ago. Now it has a tall friend, some kind of brassica, with it. It kind of looks like kale, but we shall know soon enough.

In case that isn’t enough, another little seedling is joining in.
So far, this one ain’t talkin’.

;-P

Apr 19

How to Make a Mason Bee House

help save the bees

We’ve seen a number of how to’s on making a mason bee house, this is one of the best ones.

Basically you need a wooden frame and anything that either already is hollow, or can be made so.

We used different size bamboo canes, with diameters up to about 1/2 inch. We also used old corn stalks from last summer. They are either hollow already or the bees can easily chew their way in.

We overestimated how many canes we would need when we built the frame, so we drilled a few wooden blocks and added a wee bit of whimsy to help fill in the area.

This figurine is of a bird catching a butterfly with a net, a gift from my late mother. So in her honor we set up an old birdbath in her area of the garden and placed the bee house on the basin. We added dirt to the basin, which will become mud when it rains tonight. Once we see the nesting is pretty much complete, we’ll cover the basin to be sure there is a safe place for the young ones to land when they emerge.

The area also has lots of fallen leaves. We learned from the video that different mason bees use either mud or leaves to seal their larva in the hollow opening.

This area is the southeast section of the garden, which is where it is recommended to place the house. We used twine to secure the house to the fence, just to play it safe.

Now we will wait and see. How fun!

More mason bee tips.

Apr 10

4 Things to Know About Self-Pollination

Pea Flower

Pea Flower

You don’t need to know how plants are pollinated to grow food, but having some information will help your grow better.

The most confusion we see about pollination centers around the terms self-pollination and self-pollinated.
Here’s the deal:

1. The term does not refer to a gardener moving pollen from a male flower to a female flower themselves. This is hand pollination.

2. The term is often, somewhat incorrectly, used to describe a plant whose flower has both the male and female parts on it. Technically, this is a self-fertile flower and may or may not be self-pollinating. A good example of this is pepper plants. Their flowers have both male and female flower parts on each flower. Even if the pollen got on the female part itself, the resulting fruit would likely be malformed. It is much better if the wind moves the pollen, aka wind pollination, or if the vibrations of a bee’s wings does the job. The pollen can also be moved using a tuning fork or electric toothbrush near the flower to simulate a bee’s wings, or by gently brushing the tops of the plants as you walk by.

3. Only a few plants actually self-pollinate. The most common are peas, many types of beans, and other legumes like peanuts. Peas and beans self-pollinate as the flowers open. Soybeans self-pollinate when the flower closes. Peanuts are also fertilized within the flower, then they drop to the ground for the nut to grow below soil level.

4. Pretty much all other flowering veggies need either the wind, as we mentioned, or human and/or insect help. Keep in mind also that it takes a lot of pollen to produce a healthy fruit. Usually when we are asked about a malformed fruit, or a fruit developing then suddenly shriveling up and falling off, it is due to under-pollination.

So now you know that the only veggie plants that are reliable at producing fruit with every flower are probably in the family of legumes. Garden on!

Mar 08

Listada de Gandia Eggplant

Listada de Gandia eggplant

A gardening friend told us this is the only variety of eggplant he grows anymore. Botanical Interests describes this heirloom as “So pretty, you can grow it in the flower garden. Its thin skin, mild flavor and tender texture ensure you will enjoy every bite!”

They go on to say that the skin is so thin that peeling isn’t required. We didn’t need anymore convincing.

You can see how healthy the plant is. The seed were sown on Feb. 1st, just 5 weeks ago, and germinated in 6 days. We intend to grow this one in the greenhouse, so will have a one month jump-start on the season. We should start getting fruit somewhere around mid-July.

Eggplant is well received in this house. Here are a few recipes you might like.
Can’t wait to try our hands at some more with these!

How to Grow Eggplant

Mar 01

About Starting Seeds Indoors

indoor seed starting

There are probably as many ways to start seeds indoors as there are gardeners. Mandolin suggested we share what we do, in case it might help someone else.

It is pretty basic really. We have metal shelves that just fit over our kitchen propane fireplace. This provides a heat source at no additional cost to us.

We use the smallest plastic solo cups for the seeds. We cut drainage holes in them by turning a whole stack upside down, and using a sharp knife to make slits. Keeping them stacked prevents the cups from collapsing under the weight of the knife.

After putting some seed starting mix into the cup we place the seed on the mix, then add enough mix to make the seed planted at the depth suggested on the seed packet. Water a little, and place in a plastic tray. The trays we use are from a company called Planter’s Pride, and they originally came with seed starting pellets. We prefer the cups though, and the tray holds them in place. The lid has a cutaway on each side to allow for air flow. You can also just prop the lid a bit if you have a different brand.

We cover the plastic tray, then put that on an enamelware tray that sits directly on the fireplace. This buffers the heat perfectly. A cookie sheet would do the same.

seedlings

As the seedlings emerge and grow, they graduate to larger cups and move up the shelves. Later in the season when we need more room, an additional light is hung over the top shelf. If we want to have more than one tray of starts, we just alternate their places on the shelves or fireplace every few days. When they sprout, again, they move to a higher shelf.

We keep track of what is what by numbering the cups with permanent marker, and keeping a list on the computer.

Easy peasy.
More tips on starting seeds indoors.

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