Tag: gardening techniques

Apr 01

Q#3 Why Shouldn’t I Water My Tomatoes From Above?

Tomato seedlings.

A lot of gardeners know that the recommendation for tomatoes is to water them at ground level. Some just accept that as fact, and others question the advice. It doesn’t make much sense, after all, Mother Nature waters from above, right? There are a couple of things to consider here: 1. Mother Nature wants your …

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Mar 22

Q#2 What’s Wrong With My Seedlings’ Bottom Leaves?

Those bottom leaves.

Often gardeners will notice that the first set of leaves, known as Seed Leaves or Cotydelons have turned yellow, dried up, or even fallen off. This is no cause for alarm. The job of these leaves is done, and as long as the rest of the plant remains healthy, there is nothing to worry about. …

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Mar 18

15 Varieties of Dry Beans

The beautiful Tiger's Eye.

A wonderful and often versatile crop, beans that produce edible seeds that dry right on the plant are both nutritious and easy to grow. Many kinds can also be enjoyed as a snap or shelled bean, giving you a longer fresh supply of produce. Once they dry, they are easy to store in any food …

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Mar 11

Kikuza Pumpkin

Easy to grow vertically.

Mandolin and I enjoy growing unusual varieties of food, and last summer we experimented with this Kikuza winter squash. It is a pumpkin originally from Japan, but we were able to get seeds from Baker Creek. The fruit are only a few pounds each, so they lend themselves well to growing vertically, yet they are …

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Feb 28

Tatume

Now it is a winter squash.

Wouldn’t it be nice if, having forgotten to pick a zucchini, it just turned into a winter squash instead of just getting bigger and more seedy? We could probably just end this post here, because that is exactly what the heirloom Tatume does. It is a vining squash that can be picked green as a …

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Feb 18

5 Things to Know About Days to Maturity

See it? To the right.

Usually you will see a number range listed on a seed packet or in a catalog that is called Days to Maturity, or sometimes simply DTM. This refers to the amount of time you will need to give that seed time to mature and start producing. Well, sort of. Here’s how to understand what days …

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